Meta-reflection: Standard 9: Cultural Sensitivity

A partnership between communities, homes, and schools is vital to the success of all children. A partnership implies that all parties involved have equal responsibility to foster literary development in all aspects of a child’s life. A common vision targeted at high expectations is necessary for student achievement. This artifact satisfies standard 9: Cultural sensitivity: Establishes a culturally inclusive learning climate that facilitates academic engagement and success for all students.

A Partnership for Success

Two of my colleagues and I created this power point presentation to better understand and aid our fellow educators’ understandings in how children learn language, to investigate the positive and negative impacts of second-language learning and to better serve students with language disorders. This artifact also satisfies standard 9: Cultural sensitivity.

Language Development and Linguistic Diversity Powerpoint Presentation

Below is a direct link to all artifacts and discussions that I feel have implications regarding cultural sensitivity.

https://oswook.wordpress.com/category/standard-9-cultural-sensitivity/

Advertisements

Cultural Relevance and Community-School Relationships

“Cultural relevance, Building partnerships with families…finding common ground with parents…family involvement will need to include options that accommodate family circumstances, provide choices, validate the family’s culture and values, and explicitly emphasize the importance of family support of the student’s learning” (Nine Characteristics, 120).

Throughout the discussion cultural relevance came up often as an integral element in serving all students and their families. Many ideas were mentioned to promote a more cohesive relationship between schools and culturally diverse communities. Providing various venues for families to attend parent/teacher/student conferences such as gymnasiums, community centers or parks could alleviate any pressure parents may feel toward government institutions; the idea of meeting on common ground.

“When this partnership is extended to include the larger community, the benefits are greater yet. Perhaps most important is that when responsibility for children’s learning is shared by the school, home, and community, children have more opportunities for meaningful, engaged learning. Students are able to see the connection between the curriculum in the school and the skills that are required in the real world” (http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/envrnmnt/famncomm/pa400.htm).   Developing culturally integrated educational opportunities such as the development of story poles which occurred on the Tulalip Indian Reservation a couple years ago and this year! This provides students, families, community and school members an opportunity to collaborate and work together on a complex and culturally meaningful project that inspires pride and confidence in one’s self and culture.

“This vision of school improvement compels us to create a new conception of the appropriate relationship between the school and its community, parents, and families. Pedagogically, as we have come to know the importance of rooting learning in children’s real lives, we can no longer tolerate the artificial boundaries between the classroom and the home. Politically, as we move the authority for decision making down to those closest to children, we cannot afford to exclude parents and community members from the process of crafting new schools. Nor can we avoid being held more directly accountable to the immediate community constituency for decisions made at the school site. Practically, schools have no chance of enacting the fundamental changes on the reform agenda in the absence of whole-hearted support from the entire community–parents, citizens, and business” (http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/envrnmnt/famncomm/pa400.htm).

As the above website mentioned, it is when we begin leading the students to middle and high school that parent involvement seems to drop. This is the time where we need to be most adamant but also begin developing the student’s independence by developing programs that support business, school and student relationships. The Council for Corporate and School Partnerships not only gives ideas for mentorships and apprenticeships but also on how to engage the local businesses in educating our youth. In my experience, local businesses and service industries such as the police department, Home Depot and the PUD are all extremely engaging and educational opportunities to involve our community members in our children’s educations and a great way to build an expanded community relationship!

Is culturally relevant professional development necessary for teachers to be the most effective educators for Native American students?

In the following document you will see my research proposal for enhancing Native students’ educational experience through professional development for teachers of Native students.

Native American students have consistently scored lower than their European American peers on the WASL in the areas of reading and math. Teachers that receive professional development centered  around the needs of Native American populations will have a positive impact on the academic success of Native American students as well as provide a more diverse education for non-Native students.

NA research proposal

Language Development and Linguistic Diversity

Two of my colleagues and I created this power point presentation to better understand and aid our fellow educators’ understandings in how children learn language, to investigate the positive and negative impacts of second-language learning and to better serve students with language disorders. Language Development and Linguistic Diversity power point

Empowering Our Youth: Providing Opportunities For Discovery

The artifact below focuses on my understanding of how people learn, what the best environmental contexts for learning are, what motivates learners, what my role as a professional educator is and how these all combine into my personal pedagogy.

Human Development and Principles of Learning

Theory of Multiple Intelligences

This paper focuses on the importance of integrating the multiple intelligences, defined by Howard Gardner, while planning instruction in order to more effectively teach all students. This paper demonstrates knowledge regarding standard 1 specifically. Theory of Multiple Intelligences